Top Universities where you can study for free (including International Students))

Information they say, is power. Could you ever have believed that you could study for free, no tuition fees, even as an international student?

Welcome to Norway!

In Norway, many public universities do not charge tuition fees, meaning that you can study free of charge, whether you’re a citizen or international student. All you have to worry about is feeding yourself and your accommodation. Another good thing is, you don’t have to worry about learning another language to be able to survive, because most of the population speak English language.

About Norway

Norway, officially the Kingdom of Norway, is a Nordic country in Northern Europe whose mainland territory comprises the western and northernmost portion of the Scandinavian Peninsula. The remote Arctic island of Jan Mayen and the archipelago of Svalbard also form part of Norway. Bouvet Island, located in the Subantarctic, is a dependency of Norway; it also lays claims to the Antarctic territories of Peter I Island and Queen Maud Land.

Norway has a total area of 385,207 square kilometres (148,729 sq mi) and had a population of 5,385,300 in November 2020. The country shares a long eastern border with Sweden (1,619 km or 1,006 mi long). Norway is bordered by Finland and Russia to the north-east and the Skagerrak strait to the south, with Denmark on the other side. Norway has an extensive coastline, facing the North Atlantic Ocean and the Barents Sea. The maritime influence also dominates Norway’s climate with mild lowland temperatures on the sea coasts, whereas the interior, while colder, is also a lot milder than areas elsewhere in the world on such northerly latitudes. Even during polar night in the north, temperatures above freezing are commonplace on the coastline. The maritime influence brings high rainfall and snowfall to some areas of the country.

Harald V of the House of Glücksburg is the current King of Norway. Erna Solberg has been prime minister since 2013 when she replaced Jens Stoltenberg. As a unitary sovereign state with a constitutional monarchy, Norway divides state power between the parliament, the cabinet and the supreme court, as determined by the 1814 constitution. The kingdom was established in 872 as a merger of many petty kingdoms and has existed continuously for 1,149 years. From 1537 to 1814, Norway was a part of the Kingdom of Denmark–Norway, and from 1814 to 1905, it was in a personal union with the Kingdom of Sweden. Norway was neutral during the First World War and remained so until April 1940 when the country was invaded and occupied by Germany until the end of World War II.

Norway has both administrative and political subdivisions on two levels: counties and municipalities. The Sámi people have a certain amount of self-determination and influence over traditional territories through the Sámi Parliament and the Finnmark Act. Norway maintains close ties with both the European Union and the United States. Norway is also a founding member of the United Nations, NATO, the European Free Trade Association, the Council of Europe, the Antarctic Treaty, and the Nordic Council; a member of the European Economic Area, the WTO, and the OECD; and a part of the Schengen Area. In addition, the Norwegian languages share mutual intelligibility with Danish and Swedish.

Norway maintains the Nordic welfare model with universal health care and a comprehensive social security system, and its values are rooted in egalitarian ideals. The Norwegian state has large ownership positions in key industrial sectors, having extensive reserves of petroleum, natural gas, minerals, lumber, seafood, and fresh water. The petroleum industry accounts for around a quarter of the country’s gross domestic product (GDP). On a per-capita basis, Norway is the world’s largest producer of oil and natural gas outside of the Middle East.

The country has the fourth-highest per-capita income in the world on the World Bank and IMF lists. On the CIA’s GDP (PPP) per capita list (2015 estimate) which includes autonomous territories and regions, Norway ranks as number eleven. It has the world’s largest sovereign wealth fund, with a value of US$1 trillion. Norway has had the highest Human Development Index ranking in the world since 2009, a position also held previously between 2001 and 2006; it also has the highest inequality-adjusted ranking per 2018. Norway ranked first on the World Happiness Report for 2017 and currently ranks first on the OECD Better Life Index, the Index of Public Integrity, the Freedom Index, and the Democracy Index. Norway also has one of the lowest crime rates in the world.

The majority of the population is Nordic. In the last couple of years, immigration has accounted for more than half of population growth. The five largest minority groups are Norwegian-Poles, Lithuanians, Norwegian-Swedes, Norwegian-Kurdistanis, and Norwegian-Pakistanis.

 

 

Free Universities In Norway

Below is a list of free universities in Norway where you can study for free, whether you’re a citizen or international student.

Norwegian University of Science and Technology

The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) is a public research university in Norway with the main campus in Trondheim and smaller campuses in Gjøvik and Ålesund. The largest university in Norway, NTNU has over 8,000 employees and over 40,000 students. NTNU in its current form was established by the King-in-Council in 1996 by the merger of the former University of Trondheim and other university-level institutions, with roots dating back to 1760, and has later also incorporated some former university colleges. NTNU is consistently ranked in the top one percentage among the world’s universities, usually in the 101–500 range depending on ranking.

NTNU has the main national responsibility for education and research in engineering and technology, and is the successor of Norway’s preeminent engineering university, the Norwegian Institute of Technology (NTH), established by Parliament in 1910 as Norway’s national engineering university. In addition to engineering and natural sciences, the university offers higher education in other academic disciplines ranging from medicine, psychology, social sciences, the arts, teacher education, architecture and fine art. NTNU is well known for its close collaboration with industry, and particularly with its R&D partner SINTEF, which provided it with the biggest industrial link among all the technical universities in the world. The university’s academics include three Nobel laureates in medicine, Edvard Moser, May-Britt Moser and John O’Keefe

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Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences

Oslo and Akershus University College (HiOA) was the largest state university college in Norway from its establishment in 2011 until 2018, when it was transformed into Oslo Metropolitan University, the youngest of Norway’s new universities.

It had more than 20,000 students and 2,100 employees. HiOA had higher education programs at bachelor’s, master’s and PhD level. It offered studies and conducted research in health professions, social sciences, engineering, liberal arts, and other fields.

HiOA was established in 2011 following the merger of Oslo University College and Akershus University College, which were themselves the results of many previous mergers. In 2014 the Work Research Institute and Norwegian Social Research were also merged into the institution, and from 2016 it also incorporates the Norwegian Institute for Urban and Regional Research and the National Institute for Consumer Research. Most of the university college was located in the city centre of Oslo along the Pilestredet street, with subsidiary campuses in Sandvika and Kjeller in Akershus.

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University of Nordland

The University of Nordland, (Abbreviation: UIN) previously Bodø University College, was a public university located in Bodø, Norway. In January 2016, the university was merged with Nesna University College and Nord-Trøndelag University College, becoming Nord University.

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University of Bergen

The University of Bergen  is a public university located in Bergen, Norway. The university today serves approximately 17,000 students, and is one of the ten universities in Norway.

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Bergen University College

Through long and established experience within the field of inter-professional education, Bergen University College, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, contributes with a high level of knowlege and expertise, both within research and education of inter-professional learning.

Bergen University College, the Faculty of Health and Social Sciences is a collaborating partner in the Centre and a member of the consortium, and is represented in board of leaders and the work-group in TVEPS.

The Faculty of Health and Social Sciences also participates in a national network in inter-professional learning. The network is coalition of researcher within the field of health and social care at the Norwegian college universities.

The network was established on mars 13th 2013, and has the aim to exchange knowlege and experience, and contribute to a higher level of collaboration between people and research groups that works within the field of interp-rofessional collaboration.

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BI Norwegian Business School

BI Norwegian Business School (BI) is the largest business school in Norway and the second largest in all of Europe. BI has in total four campuses with the main one located in Oslo. The university has 845 employees consisting of an academic staff of 404 people and 441 administrative staff. In 2015, BI Norwegian Business School had 18,728 students. BI is the largest supplier of economic and administrative competence and skills in Norway with more than 200,000 graduates since 1983. BI Norwegian Business School is a private foundation and is accredited by NOKUT as a specialised university institution. BI organised its academic activities in nine separate research departments covering all of the disciplines that can be expected at a modern European business school

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The Arctic University of Norway

The University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway is the world’s northernmost university. Located in the city of Tromsø, Norway, it was established in 1968, and opened in 1972. It is one of ten universities in Norway. The University of Tromsø is the largest research and educational institution in Northern Norway and the sixth-largest university in Norway. The University’s location makes it a natural venue for the development of studies of the region’s natural environment, culture, and society.

The main focus of the University’s activities is on auroral light research, space science, fishery science, biotechnology, linguistics, multicultural societies, Saami culture, telemedicine, epidemiology and a wide spectrum of Arctic research projects. The close vicinity of the Norwegian Polar Institute, the Norwegian Institute of Marine Research and the Polar Environmental Centre gives Tromsø added weight and importance as an international centre for Arctic research. Research activities, however, are not limited to Arctic studies. The University researchers work within a broad range of subjects and are recognised both nationally and internationally.

On 1 January 2009, the University of Tromsø merged with Tromsø University College. On 1 August 2013, the university merged with Finnmark University College to form Universitetet i Tromsø – Norges arktiske universitet (The University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway), thereby adding campuses in Alta, Hammerfest and Kirkenes. On 1 January 2016, Narvik University College and Harstad University College merged with UiT – The Arctic University of Norway. As of January 2016 the university now has six campus locations in northern Norway, the main campus being

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Hedmark University of Applied Science

Hedmark University of Applied Sciences was a høgskole, a Norwegian state institution of higher education, in the county of Innlandet, Norway. The college’s four campuses are located in Hamar, Elverum, Åmot (Rena) and Stor-Elvdal. It was established 1 August 1994, and had approximately 5,250 students and 450 employees. From 1 January 2017 Hedmark University of Applied Sciences and Lillehammer University College were merged into the new institution, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences (INN University).

The university was divided into four faculties: the Faculty of Health and Sports, the Faculty of Education and Natural Sciences Design, the Faculty of Forestry and Wildlife Management, and the Faculty of Business Administration, Social Sciences and Computer Science

Lillehammer University College

Lillehammer University College was a Norwegian state university college located at Storhove in Lillehammer. It was merged into the Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences in 2017. It was established in 1971 as Oppland College and took its current form in 1995. It is located in the television and radio center built for the 1994 Winter Olympic Games. The college offered undergraduate programs in Travel and Tourism, Business Administration, Organisation and Management, Film and Television, Health and Social Work, Humanities and Social Sciences, and graduate programs in Education, Social Policy, Health and Social Work for Children and Youth, Social Welfare, and Film and TV Science.

From 1 January 2017 Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences began operations on six campuses in south-eastern Norway: Lillehammer, Hamar, Blæstad, Elverum, Rena and Evenstad and has approximately 13,000 students and 952 employees

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MF Norwegian School of Theology

MF Norwegian School of Theology, Religion and Society (MF ), formerly the Free Faculty of Theology  and MF Norwegian School of Theology, is an accredited Norwegian Specialized University focused on Theology, Religion, Education and Social Studies, located in Oslo, Norway.

MF was founded in 1907 as an independent theological institution at university level and is Norway’s largest provider of theological education and research. MF has around 110 employees, 1300 bachelor and master students and about 60 ph.d. students.

Since 1967, MF has offered academic studies in Christianity and religion for use in school and society. As needs have arisen, MF has developed a broad portfolio of professional degrees for church and school. The religious demography of Norway has changed significantly. There is an increasing need and demand for knowledge and quality in research on, education in and communication about religion and society. MF meets this challenge through interdisciplinary research on religion and society, along with relevant bachelor, master and ph.d. degrees in theology, religion and society.

MF has two centers:

MF KOM – Center for Excellence in Research, Development and Communication for Church and Congregation. This center is an intermediary between scholars at MF and church workers who wish to utilize MF’s competency in their own contexts.

MF Center for the Advanced Study of Religion, MF CASR, organizes the research on religion done at MF. It facilitates joint projects between MF and other institutions. MF CASR encompasses areas of research including religious studies, history of religion, philosophy of religion, texts and manuscript research, cultural and art history, along with sociology of religion.

Norwegian Philological Institute (PHI) is affiliated with and located at MF. The cooperation involves offering courses in classical languages connected with major world religions and cultures.

MF’s areas of activity are education, research and communication.

Beginning as a confessional school, today it is an ecumenical inclusive school offering education specific to a number of denominations (Lutheran, Methodist, Catholic, Salvation Army and Pentecostal)

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Molde University College – Specialized University in Logistics

Molde University College – Specialized University in Logistics (abbreviated HiM) is a Norwegian specialized university. It is located in the town of Molde in Molde Municipality, Møre og Romsdal county, Norway. The university offers higher education in business administration, logistics, information technology, and health sciences.

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Degrees are offered both at Bachelor, Master of Science, and PhD level. The institution belonged to the university colleges until 1 January 2010, when it received its new status as a specialized university in logistics. It is one of nine specialized universities in the Norwegian higher education system. The main campus is in Molde, but some study programs are offered in Kristiansund. Møre Research Institute is also located on campus

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Bergen Academy of Art & Design, Norway

Bergen Academy of Art and Design or KHiB is one of the two independent institutions of higher learning in the visual arts and design in Norway. It is located in Bergen, Norway

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Narvik University College

Narvik University College merged with UiT – The Arctic University of Norway (UiT) from 1 January 2016 and is now named UiT – The Arctic University of Norway, campus Narvik. UiT, campus Narvik has approximately 2000 students and 220 employees.

The campus offers bachelor’s degrees in nursing, business and administration as well as engineering, and various master’s degrees in Technology. It also offers a PhD in technology.

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Nesna University College

Nesna University College (HiNe) was a university college, a Norwegian state institution of higher education, until it became part of Nord University in 2016. Its campus was in the village of Nesna in Nesna Municipality. In April 2019, the university board of directors proposed a measure to close this campus by 2022 and in May 2019, the campus was closed by order of the health and safety representative effective immediately. This led to large student protests and demonstrations primarily directed against the closure, but also as a broader protest against the municipal and region mergers put into effect by the Solberg Cabinet

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NLA University College

NLA University College is a private Norwegian Christian college accredited by the Norwegian Agency for Quality Assurance in Education. The school has about 2,000 students and 200 employees distributed across three institutions: Bergen NLA College, Gimlekollen NLA College in Kristiansand, and Staffeldtsgate NLA College in Oslo. The institution in Bergen is the largest and hosts the college’s head office. NLA University College acquired its institutions in Oslo and Kristiansand after the colleges there merged with NLA University College on January 1, 2013.

NLA University College is the only private college in Norway offering primary school teacher education. This program is offered in Bergen, where preschool teacher education is also offered together with bachelor’s and master’s degrees in education, intercultural understanding, and theology / practical theology and management. In Oslo, bachelor’s degrees in economics are offered through the Hauge School of Management, as well as bachelor’s degrees in music performance and practical theology. The Gimlekollen NLA College site offers a bachelor’s and master’s degree in journalism, as well as bachelor’s degrees and one-year programs in intercultural communication, communication and life orientation, and information and communication work.

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Norwegian School of Sport Sciences

The Norwegian School of Sport Sciences (NIH) is a public university located at Sognsvann in Oslo, Norway. It has the national responsibility for education and research related within sport sciences. It provides education at the Bachelor, Master and Doctorate levels.

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Norwegian School of Veterinary Science

Norwegian School of Veterinary Science or NVH was a public university located at Adamstuen in Oslo, that educated veterinarians and veterinary nurses as well as research within aquatic medicine, food safety, comparative medicine and mammalian diseases, health and welfare. The institution had about 450 employees and 500 students. Parts of the research were conducted in Tromsø and Sandnes.

On 6 January 2014 the school joined with the Norwegian University of Life Sciences in Ås, and by 2020 it will be completely relocated to the same location

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Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

The Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) is a public research university in Norway with the main campus in Trondheim and smaller campuses in Gjøvik and Ålesund. The largest university in Norway, NTNU has over 8,000 employees and over 40,000 students. NTNU in its current form was established by the King-in-Council in 1996 by the merger of the former University of Trondheim and other university-level institutions, with roots dating back to 1760, and has later also incorporated some former university colleges. NTNU is consistently ranked in the top one percentage among the world’s universities, usually in the 101–500 range depending on ranking.

NTNU has the main national responsibility for education and research in engineering and technology, and is the successor of Norway’s preeminent engineering university, the Norwegian Institute of Technology (NTH), established by Parliament in 1910 as Norway’s national engineering university. In addition to engineering and natural sciences, the university offers higher education in other academic disciplines ranging from medicine, psychology, social sciences, the arts, teacher education, architecture and fine art. NTNU is well known for its close collaboration with industry, and particularly with its R&D partner SINTEF, which provided it with the biggest industrial link among all the technical universities in the world. The university’s academics include three Nobel laureates in medicine, Edvard Moser, May-Britt Moser and John O’Keefe

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Oslo School of Architecture and Design

The Oslo School of Architecture and Design (AHO) is an autonomous institution within the Norwegian university system. The School offers a unique research-based education with a strong international standing within the fields of architecture, urbanism, design and landscape architecture

AHO offers three full-time master’s programmes: Master of Architecture, Master of Design and Master of Landscape Architecture – the last programme is offered in Oslo and at the Arctic University in Tromsø. The school also offers post-professional Master’s courses in Urbanism and Architectural Conservation. AHO offers a single type of doctoral degree, the Doctor of Philosophy.

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Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences

Oslo and Akershus University College (abbr. HiOA) was the largest state university college in Norway from its establishment in 2011 until 2018, when it was transformed into Oslo Metropolitan University, the youngest of Norway’s new universities.

It had more than 20,000 students and 2,100 employees. HiOA had higher education programs at bachelor’s, master’s and PhD level. It offered studies and conducted research in health professions, social sciences, engineering, liberal arts, and other fields.

HiOA was established in 2011 following the merger of Oslo University College and Akershus University College, which were themselves the results of many previous mergers. In 2014 the Work Research Institute and Norwegian Social Research were also merged into the institution, and from 2016 it also incorporates the Norwegian Institute for Urban and Regional Research and the National Institute for Consumer Research. Most of the university college was located in the city centre of Oslo along the Pilestredet street, with subsidiary campuses in Sandvika and Kjeller in Akershus.

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Østfold University College

Østfold University College (HiØ) is a university college in Viken county, Norway. It has campuses in Fredrikstad and Halden, and has around 7000 students (as of 2017) and 550 employees (as of 2017). The university college is one of the public university colleges in Norway, and is a result of five public colleges in Halden, Sarpsborg and Fredrikstad which were joined together as a part of the University College Reform (Norwegian: Høgskolereformen) of 1994.

The school offers over 60 fields of study, ranging from Associate degrees, Bachelor’s degrees, Master’s degrees, and some Doctorates.

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Stord/Haugesund University College

Stord/Haugesund University College (HSH) was a medium sized state university college in Norway before it was merged with Bergen University College and Sogn og Fjordane University College. The university college offered bachelor and master degrees in various fields (including information and communication technology, safety management, health sciences, and marine studies) and courses for professionals. The university college also had several PhD students working in various disciplines. The institution did not have the power to award doctoral degrees which must be awarded by an external institution.

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The university college was established in 1994 when the Norwegian college system was restructured and Haugesund Sjukepleierhøgskole (Haugesund Nursing College), Stord Lærarhøgskule (Stord Teachers College) and Stord Sjukepleiarhøgskule (Stord Nursing College) merged. As a result, there are now campuses both in Haugesund and on Stord. The largest campus is located in Haugesund however as the administration is based in Stord, the Stord campus appears first in the name of the institution.

While HSH was formed fairly recently, the history of the founding institutions dates back to 1839 when teachers were educated on Stord. HSH in Haugesund dates back to 1985, when maritime education was offered. The development of HSH continues. Since 2008, HSH has been a partner in UH-nett Vest (Universitets- og høgskolenettet på Vestlandet). This organisation attempts to foster greater cooperation between the participating institutions.

As well as teaching, HSH also has a significant research output. In 2008, HSH recorded 53 publication points, a 49% increase on 2007.

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The University Centre in Svalbard

The University Centre in Svalbard (UNIS) is a Norwegian state-owned limited company that is involved in research and provides some university-level education in Arctic studies. The company is wholly owned by the Ministry of Education and Research, and the universities of Oslo, Bergen, Tromsø, NTNU and NMBU appoint the board of directors. It is led by a director appointed by the board for a four-year term. The centre is the world’s northernmost research and higher education institution, in Longyearbyen at 78° N latitude. The courses offered fall into four main science disciplines: Arctic biology, Arctic geology, Arctic geophysics and Arctic technology

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University of Agder (UiA)

The University of Agder, formerly known as Agder College and Agder University College, is a public university with campuses in Kristiansand and Grimstad, Norway. The institution was established as a university college (høgskole) in 1994 through the merger of the Agder University College and five other colleges, including a technical college and a nursing school, and was granted the status of a full university in 2007.

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University of Oslo (UiO)

The University of Oslo, until 1939 named the Royal Frederick University, is the oldest university in Norway, located in the Norwegian capital of Oslo. Until 1 January 2016 it was the largest Norwegian institution of higher education in terms of size, now surpassed only by the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. The Academic Ranking of World Universities has ranked it the 58th best university in the world and the third best in the Nordic countries. In 2015, the Times Higher Education World University Rankings ranked it the 135th best university in the world and the seventh best in the Nordics. While in its 2016, Top 200 Rankings of European universities, the Times Higher Education listed the University of Oslo at 63rd, making it the highest ranked Norwegian university.

The university has approximately 27,700 students and employs around 6,000 people. Its faculties include (Lutheran) theology (with the Lutheran Church of Norway having been Norway’s state church since 1536), law, medicine, humanities, mathematics, natural sciences, social sciences, dentistry, and education. The university’s original neoclassical campus is located in the centre of Oslo; it is currently occupied by the Faculty of Law. Most of the university’s other faculties are located at the newer Blindern campus in the suburban West End. The Faculty of Medicine is split between several university hospitals in the Oslo area. The university also includes some formally independent, affiliated institutes such as the Centre for International Climate and Environmental Research (CICERO), NKVTS and the Frisch Centre.

The university was founded in 1811 and was modeled after the University of Copenhagen and the recently established University of Berlin. It was originally named for King Frederick VI of Denmark and Norway, and received its current name in 1939. The university is informally also known as Universitetet (“the university”), having been the only university in Norway, until 1946 and was commonly termed “The Royal Frederick’s” (Det Kgl. Frederiks), before the name change.

The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded in the university’s Atrium, from 1947 to 1989 and will be so again in 2020, making it the only university in the world to be involved in awarding a Nobel Prize. Since 2003, the Abel Prize is awarded in the Atrium. Five researchers affiliated with the university have been Nobel laureates.

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University of Stavanger (UiS)

The University of Stavanger is a university located in Stavanger, Norway. UiS was established in 2005 when the former Høgskolen i Stavanger (HiS) received university status. It had about 11,000 students and 1,370 administrative, faculty and service staff in 2017.

It is organised in six faculties: Educational Sciences and Humanities, Social Sciences, Science and Technology, Performing Arts, Health Sciences and the Norwegian School of Management at UiS. There are also two national centres of expertise and the Museum of Archaeology. The university campus is located in the neighborhood of Ullandhaug.

The University of Stavanger is currently the third highest ranked in Norway in terms of research publications per member of scientific staff. The university became a member of the European Consortium of Innovative Universities (ECIU) in October 2012.

The university offers doctorates in: Literacy; Risk Management and Societal Safety; Educational Sciences; Health and Medicine; Management, Economics and Tourism; Sociology, Social Work and Culture & Society; Chemistry and Biological Science; Offshore Technology; Petroleum Technology; Risk Management and Societal Safety- Technical/Scientific Approach; and Information Technology, Mathematics, and Physics

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University of Tromsø (UiT)

The University of Tromsø, is the world’s northernmost university. Located in the city of Tromsø, Norway, it was established in 1968, and opened in 1972. It is one of ten universities in Norway. The University of Tromsø is the largest research and educational institution in Northern Norway and the sixth-largest university in Norway. The University’s location makes it a natural venue for the development of studies of the region’s natural environment, culture, and society.

The main focus of the University’s activities is on auroral light research, space science, fishery science, biotechnology, linguistics, multicultural societies, Saami culture, telemedicine, epidemiology and a wide spectrum of Arctic research projects. The close vicinity of the Norwegian Polar Institute, the Norwegian Institute of Marine Research and the Polar Environmental Centre gives Tromsø added weight and importance as an international centre for Arctic research. Research activities, however, are not limited to Arctic studies. The University researchers work within a broad range of subjects and are recognised both nationally and internationally.

On 1 January 2009, the University of Tromsø merged with Tromsø University College. On 1 August 2013, the university merged with Finnmark University College to form Universitetet i Tromsø – Norges arktiske universitet (The University of Tromsø – The Arctic University of Norway), thereby adding campuses in Alta, Hammerfest and Kirkenes. On 1 January 2016, Narvik University College and Harstad University College merged with UiT – The Arctic University of Norway. As of January 2016 the university now has six campus locations in northern Norway, the main campus being Tromsø.

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Having seen this huge list of Free Universities, a word is enough for the wise. If you are looking to get  a degree (undergraduate or advanced) from Norway, we have armed you with rich information, take the next step! Give it a shot, you have nothing to lose for trying.



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